Barangay Aranguren - Capas Tarlac (1)

Barangay Aranguren

History of Barangay Aranguren  

Barangay Aranguren is believed to be created sometimes in the first quarter of the nineteenth century, probably between 1810 to 1820. Its former name is not known for no available source of information can be found. The official name “ARANGUREN” came to be when a Catholic priest, Monsignor Jose Aranguren, Archbishop of manila in 1854 to 1860 got stranded in the place due to the deep mud along his way to Patling.

During the early years, even before its creation as a barangay (or barrio in the later days then back to the term barangay again during the Marcos regime), settlers came in from Pampanga and Nueva Ecija. The early settlers cleared huge portions of the land, marked boundaries of their own then claimed ownership until the government issued land title to them.

The main source of living then is farming, fishing and hunting game fowls and animals. Because only a few own the land, late settlers cleared huge portions of the land, marked boundaries of their own then claimed ownership until the government issued land title to them.

The main source of living then is farming, fishing and hunting game fowls and animals. Because only a few own the land, late settlers became peasants to the landowners. Some of them, especially the close friends of the landowners, were shared a portion of the land for their own.

As years go by, little by little, Aranguren was developed and became progressive as the population grew rapidly. American government established communication facilities within the US Military Reservations. Until during the Presidency of the former President Ferdinand E. Marcos distributed the agricultural land to farmers.

Aranguren became historical when a portion of the US Military Reservations (Camp O’Donnell) during the Japanese Occupation in the Philippines was used as a concentration camp after the surrender of the Filipino-American forces to the Japanese Imperial Army. This place became the final destination of seventy five thousand Filipino and American soldiers who were held prisoners of war who belong to the popular Death March, almost fifty five thousand of them died and buried in tens and hundreds in that ground. The remains of these World War II heroes were exhumed during the governance of President Ramon Magsaysay and were transferred to Mount Samat in Bataan.

In the times of President Fidel V. Ramos succeeded by President Corazon C. Aquino, the POW camp was developed into a military shrine. It became a prominent historical marker and a tourist destination dubbed as the Capas National shrine.

On the overview, Aranguren can be considered today as a progressive barangay for its vast rice and sugarcane plantation, poultries, piggeries and several business establishments operating within the area.

Called Rangali in the early days, it was renamed to Aranguren in honor of the Spanish missionary Father Gregorio Aranguring. The main products of this barangay are rice, sugarcane, ampalaya and mongo. It is also engaged in fish production, swine farm and contract growing chicken. Barangay Aranguren, the terminal point of the infamous Death March during the Second World War, is located six kilometers from the poblacion.

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